Allaying fears about becoming a parent through Antenatal Classes

Allaying fears about becoming a parent through Antenatal Classes

There's no question that becoming a parent for the first time is the most rewarding and awe-inspiring event in life. The overwhelming sense of responsibility is both magical and terrifying and many first-time parents can feel overcome with the amount of learning needed to ensure that they raise healthy, confident children. 

While it's true that no one person has yet created a definitive guide to all aspects of parenting, the positive news is that there are great resources available for new parents to help allay fears and enable them to develop the skills and resilience needed to nurture their babies. 

Support with feeding your baby

Support with feeding your baby

One of Bump to Cradle's sponsors, Medela, recently held an International Symposium on human milk and lactation. There, Prof Diane Spatz, one of the world's most influential breastfeeding experts made the point that 'Yes, breastfeeding is natural, but it does not always come naturally.'

She talks about the need to support women more with breastfeeding and that the breastfeeding community should stop referring to breastfeeding success as if we talk about success we also are referring to failure. Personally, I feel that there is enough pressure on women at this stage in life without feeling like a failure when they are struggling to breastfeed. Support needs to be increased. Full stop.

Bump to Cradle - A brief look at what we do

Bump to Cradle - A brief look at what we do

Our courses are designed to give parents to be access to local specialists who are best placed to give advice and support on all aspects of childbirth and the first few months with a newborn. Through attending our classes, you will meet other like-minded parents to be and start to build a support community, which is often vital at this time. We aim to give balanced and non judgmental advice, helping to alleviate fears of the unknown, reduce the pressure some parents to be can feel and also help you to feel as confident and prepared as you can be going into this experience!

Role of your GP after your baby is born

Role of your GP after your baby is born

When you have your baby, you can book in to see or speak to your GP at anytime if you have concerns. It may be about your baby's health, your physical health or your mental health. We will arrange to see both you and baby at 6 weeks for routine checks but before that, don’t hesitate to come and talk to us about any concerns you have. You may not normally see your GP regularly but after having a baby or even if possible during pregnancy it is a good time to find a GP you like and try to have some continuity if possible. Building a good rapport with us is so important as you start a family as we are likely to play more of a role in your new family’s lives.

Building a new support network at Bump to Cradle

Building a new support network at Bump to Cradle

There's nothing like old friends and we all know we wouldn't be where we are today if it wasn't for those that have been there along the way. That being said, having a baby is a tremendously disruptive time. It's exhilarating, scary, uplifting, anxiety-fuelled and challenging. It may be that one of your old friends is going though the same stuff at the same time and that's great, but for most of us, it won't coincide and we may end up feeling alienated from our old friends or simply unable to talk about the things that are bothering, or elating, us.

What people are saying about Antenatal Classes

What people are saying about Antenatal Classes

Bump to Cradle Antenatal Classes are changing the way that parents to be get support and advice before they have their baby. Our team of local pregnancy and postnatal experts are in the best place to deliver high quality information on the last stages of pregnancy, labour and the early postnatal period. Over a number of weeks, the aim is to gain confidence, feel supported and acknowledge and then allay a lot of natural fears about childbirth and becoming a parent.

On Becoming a Dad (by a Dad)

On Becoming a Dad (by a Dad)

Don't judge me, but one of the first things I realised before becoming a Dad was that during pregnancy, it's all about the Mum.  Now many of you expectant-fathers would probably see that as obvious.  But I didn't.  Sure, we don't have to carry the baby and go through labour - obviously.  We don't have to carry the anxiety and responsibility that comes with having a growing baby inside us.  OK, like I said - don't judge me.  But I did feel a bit left out and while I didn't admit it then, I'm happy to now.  

What to put in that hospital bag

What to put in that hospital bag

Some websites will tell you to start prepping your hospital bag from sometime in the second trimester! When I was pregnant with my first baby, I remember thinking just how much does one have to pack? What’s the emergency? It’s another thing to add to the never-ending list of prep for this new baby. The truth is, it’s not a big deal having the perfectly prepped hospital bag, and someone can always bring something in for you! So don’t stress about it, but do have it ready from 36 weeks. Make sure you’re partner is involved in the process so when you’re in labour and you need something NOW from that bag, they know where it is! Here are a few of Bump to Cradle’s tips on what to put in…

Looking after your Mental Health

Looking after your Mental Health

People don’t often talk about mental health in pregnancy and beyond. This needs to change and hopefully it is with such Antenatal Courses as Bump to Cradle.

Mental health problems still carry a stigma and this is no different when related to pregnancy and the postnatal period. Problems at this time are common. Did you know that up to 80% of women experience baby blues (low mood, irritability, anxiety, tearful in the week or so after you have your baby) and 1 in 10 women suffer with postnatal depression? Did you know that men can also experience postnatal depression? Postnatal anxiety, panic disorder and even postnatal post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also very real. This is not to say they will happen to you but awareness is surely the key to early recognition and therefore treatment.

Tips from our Night Nanny

Tips from our Night Nanny

At Bump to Cradle, we’re pretty unique. We have a team of 10 specialists on hand to give you up to date information and help you feel as supported as possible. We feel that the postnatal period is often neglected in antenatal teaching – women and their partners might learn a lot about labour but what on earth do you do when you get home and your new baby is screaming? Or just won’t go to sleep?

Breastfeeding worries?

Breastfeeding worries?

I have to admit that when I was pregnant with my first child, I remember feeling more worried about being able to breastfeed than the labour or even having a newborn to look after and how that might change mine and my husband’s lives. Breastfeeding is such an emotive topic and I have seen at first hand how women feeling the pressure to breastfeed can lead to much distress, anxiety and even contribute to postnatal depression. I was desperate to breastfeed and so determined to do it that even when my daughter had an undiagnosed tongue tie and each feed was really painful, I persevered and in the end it was a success but not without a lot of stress along the way!

Feeding Your Newborn...

Feeding Your Newborn...

Have you ever wondered why newborn babies need to feed so frequently? I certainly did when my baby was born and at times she was feeding hourly! It can be a real source of anxiety for a lot of parents. They will ask me in my GP clinics - do you think we are giving them enough milk or do I have enough milk? Why do they need to feed every hour if so?

Looking after your Pelvic Floor

Looking after your Pelvic Floor

We all know we should be doing our Pelvic Floor (or Kegel) Exercises, but how exactly do we do them? Helen Hodder, Women’s Health Physio, who is one of our 10 specialists at Bump to Cradle Antenatal Classes clears things up with some advice for pregnant women and mums.  

Pelvic floor dysfunction can lead to incontinence, constipation and prolapse to name a few. Most of us start the exercises and then get bored. Here's some tips on how to do them...

What I Wish I'd Known...

What I Wish I'd Known...

Miriam, who is a mum and the founder of Bump to Cradle Antenatal Classes puts together some tips for new parents from her experience and that of Mums and Dads she has met along the way…

 

·      Sleep when you can in the day – nap when the baby naps if possible! Or if you can’t nap, don’t do the cleaning or washing up – try to sit and relax.

 

Are you thinking about exercise during pregnancy?

Are you thinking about exercise during pregnancy?

We asked our Bump to Cradle specialist personal trainer, Vicki Hill, about her recommendations for exercise and nutrition during pregnancy...

1)   Listen to your body, maintain general fitness levels but don’t try to increase your level of fitness.

2)   Keep walking as much as you can and stay hydrated when you exercise.

3)   If you feel good, exercise throughout your pregnancy but start to taper it down and focus on breathing and relaxation techniques from 35 weeks.